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Shrimp keeping is a pretty fulfilling hobby, but it will require a high level of diligence on your part. To start, you will need to know the different shrimp varieties and their aquarium needs.

Most hobbyists prefer Neocaridina species because they are hardy and easy to begin with. It is also a good idea to buy a fully-equipped kit with everything that is needed to start keeping shrimp.

Best Shrimp Tank Kits

Best Shrimp Tank Kits

Best Shrimp Tank Kits

Below you can read about the best shrimp tank kits:

1. Aqueon 7.5 Gallon LED Shrimp Aquarium Kit

This kit is ideal for beginning freshwater shrimp keepers who want a spacious solution for their pets and plants. You get a 7.5-gallon glass aquarium featuring an elevated base and lid.

The setup also includes concealed LED lights to fulfill the lighting requirements of the tank’s inhabitants.

To prevent your shrimps from getting into the filter housing, Aqueon has fitted the QuietFlow 10 filter with an intake grid and pre-filter sponge foam. Additional accessories include a water conditioner sachet and a setup guide.

The conditioner is formulated to help the water retain the minerals needed for the development of your shrimps. It will neutralize toxic chemicals like ammonia while preserving nutrients that are useful but are often extracted through the filtration process.

Aqueon has also provided two 5-pound bags of substrate that is clay-based and perfect for shrimps. It comes in a spherical shape so that it does not lose its form and disintegrate into compressed soil.

 

2. Hagen Fluval EBI Shrimp Kit

The Fluval EBI Shrimp kit is equipped with several impressive features that make the nanoworld exciting. With a capacity of 7.9 gallons, you can rear a number of shrimp species. The powerful and energy-efficient LED lights that come with the kit will support plant growth and bring out the real colors of your pets.

Hagen has provided a lid for the tank since shrimps are known to be active climbers. You also get 2.2 lbs of Fluval Stration substrate to keep your pets comfortable.

The dark color of the substrate will add a welcome contrast to the lively colors of your shrimp while allowing your young ones to hide. The substrate is formulated from natural sources to avoid harming animals.

The EBI shrimp kit is packed with powerful 3-stage filtration media to keep the tank’s water clear and free from toxic elements. You also get a circulation pump with an output nozzle, which will encourage aeration in your aquarium.

Other accessories include a telescopic shrimp net, water conditioner, shrimp formula, and a care guide.

 

3. Penn Plax Vertex Desktop Aquarium Kit

This kit is ideal for small spaces, and it will uniquely complement a desk or dresser or any unused space around your house or office. The tank’s unique design that includes two curved corners at the front will brighten up any area and offer unobstructed views from any viewpoint.

The frameless tank included in the kit is constructed from expertly-made bent glass that is 1/8-inch thick. With measurements of 10” (H) x 9” (W) x 7.75”, the tank fit spaces like a nightstand or a bookshelf. You also get a translucent hinge-style lid to complete the beautiful setup.

The kit has been equipped with almost everything you require to keep shrimps successfully. The Cascade 20 Hang Filter provides a quiet but powerful filtration and adjustable flow control.

You do not have to worry about keeping the filter stable since it comes with a leveling device. The cartridges are disposable and replaceable.

You can forget fishing using plastic cups with this kit as it has a professional-certified Nylon “Quick Mesh” net for safe fish catching. The net is fitted with a vinyl-covered handle for comfort.

While keeping shrimps, it is vital to keep track of the temperature and ensure it is in the appropriate range. Penn Plax has included a full-range thermometer for this purpose with easy to read numbers.

Whether you are a beginner or you are in the market for an all-in-one solution, the Vertex Desktop Aquarium Kit by Penn Plax will avail all the accessories you need.

 

4. Marineland 5 Gallon Portrait Glass LED Aquarium Kit

If you want a sleek and compact kit for your home or office, consider the Marineland 5-gallon portrait glass ensemble. The tank is made of durable and robust glass that feels exceptionally stable. Its curved corners make the tank stand out, and you can expect to see the aquatic action from various angles and perspectives.

To maintain the clean look of the tank, Marineland opted for hidden filtration by installing a panel at the back. While concealed, the filtration is still powerful and efficient. The 3-stage process is completed by MarineLand Bio-Foam, a Rite-Size Z Cartridge, and an adjustable flow filter pump.

You will, however, have to allow for adequate space behind the tank for the filtration system and to make cleaning easier.

The lighting system is another winning feature with this kit. A hinged plastic strip supports six blue LEDs and nine white LEDs. The white light illuminates a shimmering light in the water to mimic the underwater world while the blue LEDs create a moonlight glow in the setup.

A 3-way switch enables you to toggle between blue and white, blue-only, and off settings. you may, however, require to invest in additional lighting if you want to keep plants that require a lot of light.

 

5. biOrb Flow 30 Aquarium with LED

This kit features a compact book-end style for your home or office. The 8-gallon tank is crafted from acrylic since it is ten times stronger than glass, and it has a 93% transparency rating.

The kit particularly shines because of its filtration system that delivers mechanical, biological, and chemical filtration as well as oxygenation and stabilization.

For biological filtration, the kit relies on special ceramic media with a surface area larger than that of a soccer field. A filter cartridge has been fitted at the base of the tank, and it should be changed every four weeks.

The tank comes with an inbuilt LED light that fits securely and illuminates the setup. The lights and the air pump are low voltage to give you peace of mind.

 

How to Choose an Aquarium for Shrimp?

There are numerous shrimp tank kits to choose from, depending on the species you intend to keep. These aquarium requirements include:

– Tank Size

It is best to start with 10 gallons since it is a significant water volume to operate. The 10-gallon setup will also be easier to maintain than smaller installations, especially because shrimps need stable water parameters.

You may be tempted to buy very small tanks for dwarf shrimps, particularly the hardy ones. While you can start with as little as five gallons, more gallons will be more forgiving for the common beginner mistakes.

The tank should also be 20 to 40 ft long since shrimps appreciate a lot of surface area.

– Filter

Perhaps the most critical factor in shrimp housing is the filtration system. Every aquarist knows the importance of having a powerful filter, and the case is no different with shrimps.

The good thing is that different options will work well with a shrimp aquarium, although you have to factor in the size of your tank.

With shrimps, it is vital to ensure that your choice of filter does not suck in the young ones. Baby shrimps are about 1 to 3 mm long, and they can easily enter your filtration system.

If you want to minimize the risk, you can opt for a basic sponge filter that is equipped with a pre-filter sponge. Sponge filters are gentle and safe for shrimps, and they work well with tanks under 20 gallons. The filters are powered by air, and you can operate them using an air pump.

Aquarists also like how easy it is to maintain sponge filters since all you need to do is rinse the sponge in the tank water.

Most aquarists prefer the efficiency of internal filters for clear and clean water. Canister filters are the go-to when you are worried about water quality setup. They mostly complement big tanks but will work with aquariums of 20 gallons and over.

The filters are not, however, advised for shrimp-only tanks since the animals are quite delicate. Some shrimp owners have even claimed in some forums that their pets became overly-sensitive and died easily because of using canister filters for a long time. You will also need to make your canister filter safe for shrimps by adding a pre-filter sponge.

Like canister filters, you also need to add a pre-filter sponge with Hang-On-Back models. Since they are positioned at the back of the tank, these solutions are ideal if you want a clean setup without any accessories visible on the tank.

– Substrate

Pet stores will typically stock shrimp-ready substrates., and the kind you choose will be informed by the shrimp species you want to keep. Neocaridina species, for example, require an inert substrate that will not lower the PH while keeping it between 6.8 to 8.0.

If you intend to maintain a planted tank, you are better off with gravel since it will allow the plants to get rooted easily. While gravel will not become compacted, you need to wash it regularly to get rid of dirt and debris.

Other aquarists prefer large-grained sand substrates because they do not trap dirt and are therefore easier to clean.

Shrimp owners commonly debate between buffering and non-buffering substrates. Buffering types like the ADA Aquasoil Amazonia have a reputation for maintaining the soft water and the low PH preferred by shrimps.

– Heater

Some aquarists keep shrimps successfully without using heaters all the time. You can, however, do this only if the temperature in your locality remains in the ideal range of 70 °F to 90 °F.

You will need a heater if your area experiences drastic fluctuations or has colder temperatures as the day progresses. Thermostat heaters come in handy in such cases as they are set to power once the temperature falls below a particular point.

When choosing a heater, use the 3 to 5 watts for every gallon guideline. It is also advisable also to get a thermometer to know the water’s temperature at all time.

– Lights

While shrimps need adequate light for growth, it is not advisable to provide it for 24 hours a day. Shrimps can often be seen scouting for hiding spaces to get away from intense light.

If you have light-hungry plants, provide a lot of cover for the pets.

– Plants and Decoration

You can provide moss and other plants to make shrimps comfortable in your setup. The animals avoid feeding on plants but will gladly consume decaying organic matter and algae, which will clean up the tank.

You can also add leaves like banana, guavas, and Indian almond leaves. Other decorations to consider include driftwood and Chola wood.

– Test Kits

A freshwater test kit is quite essential when keeping shrimps as you need to check the state of the water continually. Ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite tests are especially important when cycling your tank so that you are sure of when to add your pets.

GH and KH tests are needed to measure the General Hardness and Carbonate Hardness, respectively. Some aquarists will also get a TDS meter, which determines the Total Dissolved Solids in an aquarium. This equipment is a must-have for shrimp-keepers to ensure consistency in water parameters.

How Many Shrimp Can You Have per Gallon?

It is advisable to have 1 to 3 shrimps for a liter of water or 5 to 10 for every gallon. You can, therefore, keep a lot of them in a 10- or 20-gallon setup.

Will Shrimp Breed in a Small Tank?

It is easy to breed shrimp in a small tank, provided there is adequate food, and the water is appropriately warm. As long as you change 25% of the water every week, your aquarium will support the growth of the baby shrimps into adulthood.

Conclusion

Shrimps have become popular aquatic pets, thanks to the updated information on how to keep them. If you would rather by a shrimp tank, brands like Penn Plax, Aqueon, MarineLand, and Hagen have nano kits ready for assembly with almost everything you need.

You can also assemble your kit by buying a tank, heater, filter, thermometer, substrate, plants, and lights.

Written by Fabian

Hey, I'm Fabian, chief editor at Aquarium Nexus. I really enjoy the aquarium hobby and love sharing my experience with others. If you have any questions feel free to contact me or leave a comment below.

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